danyisnotonfire:

anne-ominous:

From what I recall the guy burning it is a model who had to wear that shirt for a shoot, and once it was done he burned the stupid thing.

now that is a cool story

"IS A MODEL"

(Source: alt-kj)



THIS ONE IS FOR MY BITCHES WIT A FAT ASS IN THE FUCKIN CLUH I SAID WHERE MY FAT ASS BIG BITCHES IN THE CLUH FUCK THE SKINNY BITCHES FUCK THE SKINNY BITCHES IN THE CLUB I WANNA I SEE ALL THE BIG FAT ASS BITCHES IN THE MOTHERFUCKIN CLUB FUCK YOU IF YOU SKINNY BITCHES WAt

justdropithere:

Gustaaf Wassink by Willy Vanderperre - Dior Homme Winter 2014-15 backstage

justdropithere:

Gustaaf Wassink by Willy Vanderperre - Dior Homme Winter 2014-15 backstage


(Source: jib--reel)


damplaundry:

Benjamin Jarvis update (via)

damplaundry:

Benjamin Jarvis update (via)


l-homme-que-je-suis:

Nicholas Costa | Siki Im Spring/Summer 2015 | New York Fashion Week | Photographed by Slaven Vlasic

l-homme-que-je-suis:

Nicholas Costa | Siki Im Spring/Summer 2015 | New York Fashion Week | Photographed by Slaven Vlasic


v4to:

benoni loos

v4to:

benoni loos

(Source: wehavenostyle)



Mats Van Snippenberg photographed by Yi Chen

Mats Van Snippenberg photographed by Yi Chen

(Source: vogueanon)


astronemma:

Fire-Breather

Like a dragon breathing fire, a powerful blast of plasma erupts from the Sun in this newly released colourised view of a ‘coronal mass ejection’.
These huge clouds of magnetised plasma are ejected from the Sun’s atmosphere – the corona – and launched into interplanetary space. Millions of tonnes of gas race away from the Sun at several million kilometres per hour.
This image shows an event observed by the SOHO satellite on 4 January 2002, coloured to indicate the intensity of the matter being ejected by the Sun. White represents the greatest intensity, red/orange somewhat less, and blue the least.
An extreme-ultraviolet view is superimposed to show the size and active regions of the Sun that day.
The shaded blue disc surrounding the Sun at the centre of the image deliberately blots out direct sunlight to allow study of the details in the corona.
When ejections like this hit planet Earth, spectacular natural light displays – aurora – can be triggered over the poles. In the most extreme events, they can lead to geomagnetic storms that can result in regional power outages and communications blackouts.

Image credit: SOHO (ESA/NASA)/S. Hill, via ESA.

astronemma:

Fire-Breather

Like a dragon breathing fire, a powerful blast of plasma erupts from the Sun in this newly released colourised view of a ‘coronal mass ejection’.

These huge clouds of magnetised plasma are ejected from the Sun’s atmosphere – the corona – and launched into interplanetary space. Millions of tonnes of gas race away from the Sun at several million kilometres per hour.

This image shows an event observed by the SOHO satellite on 4 January 2002, coloured to indicate the intensity of the matter being ejected by the Sun. White represents the greatest intensity, red/orange somewhat less, and blue the least.

An extreme-ultraviolet view is superimposed to show the size and active regions of the Sun that day.

The shaded blue disc surrounding the Sun at the centre of the image deliberately blots out direct sunlight to allow study of the details in the corona.

When ejections like this hit planet Earth, spectacular natural light displays – aurora – can be triggered over the poles. In the most extreme events, they can lead to geomagnetic storms that can result in regional power outages and communications blackouts.

Image credit: SOHO (ESA/NASA)/S. Hill, via ESA.